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How To File 2013 Taxes in 2019

Posted by on February 4, 2015
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Here's how to file 2013 Taxes. If you have tax due, you should file ASAP. Failure-to-file and failure-to-pay penalties increase by the day.

Here’s How To File 2013 Taxes Today

It’s time to file your 2018 taxes but you still need to file your late 2013 taxes. No need to panic, we’re here to help!

However, you shouldn’t wait any longer to file. In fact, IRS late fees and penalties are increasing by the day. You should also know that although you can prepare your late 2013 return online, you’ll be required to paper file it.

How To File 2013 Taxes Today

If you’ve waited until now to file your 2013 Taxes, it’s best to get it out of the way sooner rather than later. The deadline to file 2013 Taxes was April 15, 2014. For those who requested an extension on their 2013 tax return, the deadline was October 15, 2014.

As of October 15, 2014, the e-file system for 2013 returns shut down. With that said, you can no longer electronically file 2013 taxes and will be required to paper file your 2013 tax return.

Rather than wasting time trying to do the calculations yourself,  you can prepare your 2013 Taxes online with PriorTax! Here’s how;

  1. Gather your 2013 tax documents
  2. Create an Account on PriorTax
  3. Enter your information (including your personal information, income and any deductions or credits you may qualify for)
  4. Pay and submit your information
  5. Wait for the PriorTax team to prepare your tax return
  6. After one to two business days, you’ll receive an email notifying you that your tax return is available for download. Download your tax return.
  7. Print your 2013 Tax Return
  8. Sign your 2013 Tax Return
  9. Mail your 2013 Tax Return to the IRS (and if applicable, to your state)
  10. Sit Back and Relax!

 

What You Should Know About Filing Late

If you’re expecting a tax refund, the deadline has passed due to the IRS statute of limitations. You had until April 15, 2017, to claim your 2013 refund. Luckily, if you were due a refund, you won’t have to worry about being slammed with late fees or penalties.

However, if you’re filing your 2013 taxes late and have a tax due total, you’ll end up facing IRS late fees and penalties. Filing your taxes late isn’t a joke, the IRS late penalties include the following;

  • Failure-to-file: 5% of your tax due total for each month your return is filed late, up to 25%.
  • Failure-to-pay: ½ of 1% of your unpaid taxes for each month or part of a month left unpaid. (This amount is waived if you’re already facing the failure-to-file penalty.)

With that said, it’s clear that filing as soon as possible is a no-brainer. The failure-to-file penalty can be 10 times greater than the failure-to-pay penalty.

At the very least, file your 2013 taxes today and arrange an IRS payment plan if you can’t pay everything at once.

Create an Account and File Today!

Be honest with yourself- you have to file that 2013 Tax Return sooner or later. Stop procrastinating. Get it done today and save yourself the aggravation of paying an even larger late fee later on.

As always, the PriorTax team is here to help you file your late taxes via phone, chat and email support.

 

FILE NOW

2 Responses to “How To File 2013 Taxes in 2019”

  1. YGreene says:

    I have two years prior tax returns to file, years 2012 & 2013. Can I file 2012 and wait on the IRS to process it before submitting 2013?

    • admin says:

      Hello. There’s no need to wait to file your 2013. Considering that the IRS usually takes over a month to process paper filed tax returns, I would suggest filing both your 2012 and 2013 around the same time. If you have any further questions, reach out to our tax team via phone, chat or email support! If you’re ready to get started on your late tax return(s), you can create an account on PriorTax.

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